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Effect van voorlichting over sociale invloed op snack gedrag van kinderen.
Effect of information and training about social influences on children's snack food intake.



- candidate number12372
- NTR NumberNTR3459
- ISRCTNISRCTN wordt niet meer aangevraagd.
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR11-mei-2012
- Secondary IDsECG2012-2505-037 Ethical Commission
- Public TitleEffect van voorlichting over sociale invloed op snack gedrag van kinderen.
Effect of information and training about social influences on children's snack food intake.
- Scientific TitleEffect of information and training about social influences on children's snack food intake.
- ACRONYMIntervention social modeling
- hypothesisIt is hypothesized that participants who received information about social modeling effects in the intervention group consume less (snack) food compared to participants in the control group.
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedChildren, Overweight, Social modeling, Food intake
- Inclusion criteria1. Participation of primary schools and teachers;
2. Active consent of parents from boys and girls in grade 2 and 3 ('groep 4 en 5'; age 7-10) in the Netherlands.
- Exclusion criteria1. Children with medical conditions such as diabetes, lactose intolerance, food allergies (e.g., nuts, milk and cacao) are excluded because they cannot eat the test food (chocolate-coated rice crisps);
2. Dyads are excluded after participation in the study:
A. When the peer did not follow instructions;
B. When the participant became aware of the real aim of the study.
- mec approval receivedyes
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedyes
- masking/blindingSingle
- controlNot applicable
- groupParallel
- Type2 or more arms, randomized
- Studytypeintervention
- planned startdate 1-sep-2012
- planned closingdate15-jun-2012
- Target number of participants145
- InterventionsPeople are found to follow the food intake of a peer and eat more when others do. In this study it is investigated whether children can be made aware of these social modeling effects during a 10-minute intervention at school and are less influenced by the food intake of a peer (compared to the control group).

During the intervention, the children are told about social modeling effects and imitation by means of pictures of monkey's and humans who model body postures, a little movie clip in which they see children model the food intake of some one else and an exercise in which children have to model an experimenter's food choice and intake.

One day after the intervention, social modeling experiments are conducted. In a social modeling experiment, a naive participant is paired with an instructed peer. The peer is instructed to eat a certain amount of test food. During the social modeling experiment, the children are video taped.

We compare the intervention group to the control group which has received no information about social modeling effects and imitation.
- Primary outcomeTo measure social influence on food intake in the intervention group compared to the control group:
1. Snack food intake (kcal);
2. Micro-imitation: Video coding of food picking movements of the instructed peer and the participant.
- Secondary outcomeTo test other factors that affect food intake:
1. Control measures: Hunger rating, liking test food, liking instructed peer;
2. BMI, sex, age;
3. Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (eating style);
4. Evaluation of intervention (did they understand the intervention, can they provide examples of social modeling).
- TimepointsPilot study: October - December 2011;
Intervention: February - June 2012.
- Trial web siteN/A
- statusopen: patient inclusion
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIES K. Bevelander
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIES K. Bevelander
- Sponsor/Initiator Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen
- PublicationsSee for more information about social modeling: Bevelander, K.E., Anschutz, D.J. & Engels, R.C.M.E., 2012. Social norms in food intake among normal weight and overweight children. Appetite, 58 (30), 864-872.
- Brief summaryPeople are found to follow the food intake of a peer and eat more when others do. In this study it is investigated whether children can be made aware of these social modeling effects during a short intervention at school and are less influenced by the food intake of a peer (compared to the control group).

During the intervention, we explain social modeling effects and imitation to the children. On this day, the majority of the control group is tested. On the next day, the intervention group is tested. By means of social modeling experiments, we compare the food intake of the intervention group to the control group which has received no information about social modeling effects and imitation. In addition, we coded the intake movements of the participant and peer dyads to investigate micro-imitation.
- Main changes (audit trail)
- RECORD11-mei-2012 - 20-jun-2012


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