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Slow food, fast food.


- candidate number13418
- NTR NumberNTR3653
- ISRCTNISRCTN wordt niet meer aangevraagd.
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR8-okt-2012
- Secondary IDs 
- Public TitleSlow food, fast food.
- Scientific TitleSustained impact of food texture on energy intake over the course of the day.
- ACRONYMtaste study
- hypothesis1. A meal consisting of harder-textured foods leads to lower energy intake at a lunchtime meal compared to a meal with softer-textured foods;
2. The decreased energy intake of the meal composed of harder-textured foods will not be compensated at the next meal;
3. The texture of the meal will significantly change consumers eating behaviour (i.e. differences in eating rate, oral residence time and bite size of harder and softer foods/meals).
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedOverweight, Obesity
- Inclusion criteria1. BMI (18.5 - 25);
2. Age: 18-35;
3. Healthy as judged by the participant;
4. Chinese Nationality.
- Exclusion criteriaDifficulties with eating/swallowing.
- mec approval receivedno
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedyes
- masking/blindingSingle
- controlNot applicable
- groupCrossover
- TypeSingle arm
- Studytypeintervention
- planned startdate 11-okt-2012
- planned closingdate30-okt-2012
- Target number of participants52
- InterventionsThe study will be a within-subjects cross-over design that consists of two lunches with softer-textured foods and harder-textured foods. Fifty subjects will consume ad-libitum from the lunches and from a meal during dinnertime to investigate if energy intake will be compensated.
- Primary outcome1. Ad libitum intake during lunch (kcal);
2. Compensation (ad lib intake (kcal) during dinner);
3. Eating rate (g/s).
- Secondary outcome1. Bite sizes;
2. Chewing per gram;
3. Subjective ratings of hunger and fullness.
- TimepointsLunch and Dinner.
- Trial web siteN/A
- statusopen: patient inclusion
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIES Dieuwerke Bolhuis
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIES Dieuwerke Bolhuis
- Sponsor/Initiator Wageningen University (WUR)
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
Nestle, Lausanne, Switserland
- PublicationsN/A
- Brief summaryA number of studies showed that high eating rate leads to more food intake. Eating rate is influenced by the texture of the food. Hard solid foods are consumed slower than more softly textured foods. This results in lower food intakes and lower values of expected satiation for softly textured foods, as found in previous studies. A lower eating rate may also affect satiety, because it was shown to enhance the release of satiety hormones. Reductions in food intake as a result of food texture may therefore lead to a sustained decrease in energy intake over the day.
- Main changes (audit trail)
- RECORD8-okt-2012 - 22-okt-2012


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