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The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on the StartReact effect: An explorative study.


- candidate number14792
- NTR NumberNTR3975
- ISRCTNISRCTN wordt niet meer aangevraagd.
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR23-apr-2013
- Secondary IDsNL42504.091.13  CCMO
- Public TitleThe effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on the StartReact effect: An explorative study.
- Scientific TitleThe effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on the StartReact effect: An explorative study.
- ACRONYM
- hypothesisTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability. A recent study in anaesthetized cats showed that tDCS also facilitates subcortical neurons. Here, we hypothesize that subcortical facilitation also occurs in humans. We evaluate the effect of tDCS on two responses that are thought to be evoked from subcortical structures; (1) the StartReact effect, in which a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) accelerates the latencies of movement responses to an imperative stimulus, and (2) automatic postural responses to external balance perturbations.
We expect that anodal-tDCS will shorten the latencies of responses, both during the simple reaction time tasks and during the balance perturbations .
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedStartReact effect
- Inclusion criteriaOnly healthy, competent, men and women , 1845 years old, with normal hearing will be recruited.
- Exclusion criteriaWith regard to transcranial brain stimulation:
1. Serious head trauma or brain surgery;
2. Large or ferromagnetic metal parts in the head (except for a dental wire);
3. Implanted cardiac pacemaker or neurostimulator;
4. Pregnancy.

With regard to other experimental techniques:
1. Skin diseases at intended electrode sites (EMG, tDCS).

With regard to general experimental requirements:
1. Disorders of hearing;
2. Any neurological or orthopaedic disorder;
3. Cognitive impairments;
4. Any prescribed medication that can alter cortical excitability (e.g. antiepileptics, tricyclic anti-depressives or benzodiazepines) within two weeks prior to participation. Medication negatively affecting balance (e.g. neuroleptics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, sedatives).
- mec approval receivedyes
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedyes
- masking/blindingSingle
- controlPlacebo
- groupCrossover
- TypeSingle arm
- Studytypeintervention
- planned startdate 29-apr-2013
- planned closingdate31-dec-2013
- Target number of participants10
- InterventionstDCS (2 mA; 15 min) will be applied to one cortical area (M1 on the non-dominant hemisphere). In one session anodal stimulation will be given, in the other session sham stimulation will be given. The order of the sessions will be balanced over the participants.
- Primary outcomeThe main outcome variable is the reaction time in a simple reaction time task and the onset of postural responses.
- Secondary outcomeN/A
- TimepointsIn one session anodal stimulation will be given, in the other session sham stimulation will be given. The order of the sessions will be balanced over the participants.
- Trial web siteN/A
- statusopen: patient inclusion
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIES Jorik Nonnekes
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIES Jorik Nonnekes
- Sponsor/Initiator Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre
- PublicationsN/A
- Brief summaryTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability. A recent study in anaesthetized cats showed that tDCS also facilitates subcortical neurons . Here, we hypothesize that subcortical facilitation also occurs in humans. We evaluate the effect of tDCS on two responses that are thought to be evoked from subcortical structures; (1) the StartReact effect, in which a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) accelerates the latencies of movement responses to an imperative stimulus, and (2) automatic postural responses to external balance perturbations.
- Main changes (audit trail)
- RECORD23-apr-2013 - 14-mei-2013


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