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Increasing motor skills and physical activitiy in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder


- candidate number15306
- NTR NumberNTR4135
- ISRCTNISRCTN wordt niet meer aangevraagd.
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR21-aug-2013
- Secondary IDs13/245 NL43890.041.13
- Public TitleIncreasing motor skills and physical activitiy in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder
- Scientific TitleIncreasing motor skills and physical activity in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: a controlled trial.
- ACRONYM
- hypothesisThe hypothesis of this study is that an individual tailored task-oriented motor skills intervention with additional emphasis on behavioural motivation techniques will increase motor skills, physical activity, perceived motor competence and global self-worth in children with DCD.
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedMotor skill, Physical activity, DCD
- Inclusion criteria-Children referred to paediatric therapy by a general practitioner or school medical officer;
-Score on a standardised test of motor skills performance (MABC-II) below 16th percentile;
-An indication of DCD or suspected DCD on the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 as experienced by parents;
-A score below the advised amount of daily steps for children (boys < 15000; girls < 12000) on a pedometer (Yamax CW700);
-Age between 7 and 10;
-Parental informed consent and child verbal assent;
-No known neurological disorders causing motor problems (e.g. cerebral palsy, spina bifida etc.).
- Exclusion criteria-Insufficient understanding of the Dutch language;
-Children with only a low score (< 16th percentile) on the subscale manual dexterity of the MABC-II.
- mec approval receivedyes
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedno
- groupParallel
- Type2 or more arms, non-randomized
- Studytypeintervention
- planned startdate 1-sep-2013
- planned closingdate1-feb-2015
- Target number of participants48
- InterventionsIntervention group: Children in the intervention group will receive twelve individual-tailored treatment sessions of 30 minutes once a week. Treatment goals will be set for each child individually based upon structured assessment of the child’s motor skills and perceived motor competence. A variety of functional tasks and gross motor play activities will be given to enhance motor skills. During intervention sessions, behavioural motivation techniques will be used in order to enhance children’s perceived motor competence and physical activity. All participating therapists will receive special training before intervention.

Control group:
Children in the control group will receive care as usual for twelve treatment sessions of 30 minutes once a week.
- Primary outcome- physical activity as assessed with a pedometer and parental proxi-reports
- Secondary outcome- motor skills as assessed with the MABC-II and the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 (DCDQ 2007)
- perceived motor competence as assessed with the “Hoe ik vind dat ik het doe” – questionnaire
- global self-worth as assessed with the Self Perception Profile for Children
- TimepointsAssessment of both the intervention group and control group will take place at baseline (T0), after 12 treatment sessions (T1) and after 3 months of no intervention (T2)
- Trial web siteN/A
- statusplanned
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIESMsc. J.J. Noordstar
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIESMsc. J.J. Noordstar
- Sponsor/Initiator University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU)
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
Vormingsfonds Oefentherapie Cesar
- PublicationsN/A
- Brief summarySummary
Rationale: Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) experience difficulties in participation in daily life that require motor skills. Evidence suggests task-oriented motor interventions to be beneficial for improving motor skills in children with DCD. However, whether the newly learned motor skills lead to an increase in the amount of physical activities has not been investigated yet. Secondly, children with DCD are shown to have a lower perceived motor competence compared to typically developing children, which in turn, is a significant predictor of physical activity in children. Therefore, motor interventions that (also) aim to increase perceived motor competence might potentially be beneficial to improve both motor skills and physical activity in children with DCD. Studies investigating a possible additional benefit of focussing on a child’s perceived competence are currently lacking.
Objective: To investigate the short-term and long-term effects of a 12-week motor skills intervention, including behavioural motivation techniques, on physical activity, motor skills, perceived motor competence and global self-worth in children with DCD.
Study design: The study is a Clinical Controlled Trial (CCT). Assessors and paediatric therapists that administer care as usual to the control group will be blinded for treatment allocation. Assessment of both the intervention group and control group will take place at baseline (T0), after 12 treatment sessions (T1) and after 3 months of no intervention (T2).
Study population: In total, 48 children with DCD (age 7-10) will be recruited from three paediatric therapy practices in the Netherlands. Children referred to one of these paediatric therapy practices will function as the intervention group, while children referred to the other two paediatric therapy practices will function as the control group.
Intervention: Children in the intervention group will receive twelve individual-tailored treatment sessions of 30 minutes once a week. Treatment goals will be set for each child individually based upon structured assessment of the child’s motor skills and perceived motor competence. A variety of functional tasks and gross motor play activities will be given to enhance motor skills. During intervention sessions, behavioural motivation techniques will be used in order to enhance children’s perceived motor competence and physical activity. All participating therapists will receive special training before intervention. Children in the control group will receive care as usual for twelve treatment sessions of 30 minutes once a week.
- Main changes (audit trail)
- RECORD21-aug-2013 - 16-sep-2013


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