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Second language learning in adolescents with cochlear implants


- candidate number21916
- NTR NumberNTR5154
- ISRCTNISRCTN no longer applicable
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR6-apr-2015
- Secondary IDsNL51608 CCMO ABR number
- Public TitleSecond language learning in adolescents with cochlear implants
- Scientific TitleSequential second language learning and academic adjustment in hearing impaired adolescents with cochlear implants
- ACRONYMSENCHA
- hypothesisChildren with cochlear implants (CIs) learn Dutch through the input of their CIs, which offers qualitatively different sensory input than ears. Therefore, these patients are thought to develop auditory processing patterns different from normal-hearing (NH) populations. Also, decoding auditory input into meaningful linguistic information is likely requiring greater processing capacities than for NH children.

We postulate that these two CI-related factors (sensory and cognitive) may limit the capactity to learn a second spoken language (English) successively to their native language (Dutch). Mastering a second language, particularly English, has direct advantages for implanted adolescents, for example for pursuing internationally oriented careers. Also, speaking a second language likely improves cognitive control, helping these adolescents to communicate better.

The objectives of the current study are
(1) To evaluate the abilities of implanted adolescents to learn a second language in the current school settings compared to normal-hearing and hearing-impaired peers;
(2) To identify and quantify environmental, sensory and cognitive aspects that affect second language acquisition in implanted adolescents;
(3) To assess positive effects of successful L2 acquisition on CI adolescents’ speech perception in adverse listening situations.
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedHearing impairment, Deafness, Cochlear implant
- Inclusion criteria• Age: 12- 17 years
• Cognitive capacities within normal-to-above-normal range (non-verbal IQ > 80 points)
• Native Dutch speakers, English at school
• Enrolled in secondary education (‘voortgezet onderwijs’), can be either special education or standard education, but not primary education (‘basisschool’)
• Hearing status: Normal-hearing, hearing impaired without cochlear implant, hearing impaired with cochlear implant
- Exclusion criteriaOnly applicable for behavioural stage, not questionnaire stage:
• Low cognitive capacities (non-verbal IQ <80 points)
• Communication disorder (i.e., diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder)
• A history of neurological and psychiatric disorder other than a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD
- mec approval receivedno
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedno
- group[default]
- Type[default]
- Studytypeobservational
- planned startdate 17-mei-2015
- planned closingdate16-mei-2020
- Target number of participants294
- InterventionsNot applicable
- Primary outcomeSecond language proficiency as measured in self- and proxy-reports, as well as in accuracy and reaction times on different tasks.
- Secondary outcomeNative language proficiency, sensory processing abilities and cognitive capacities as measured in self- and proxy-reports, as well as inaccuracy and reaction times on different tasks.
- TimepointsNot applicable
- Trial web siteNot applicable
- status[default]
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIES DE Jung
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIES D Başkent
- Sponsor/Initiator University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG)
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
NWO
- PublicationsNot applicable
- Brief summaryChildren with cochlear implants (CIs) learn Dutch through the input of their CIs, which offers qualitatively different sensory input than ears. Therefore, these patients are thought to develop auditory processing patterns different from normal-hearing (NH) populations. Also, decoding auditory input into meaningful linguistic information is likely requiring greater processing capacities than for NH children.

We postulate that these two CI-related factors (sensory and cognitive) may limit the capactity to learn a second spoken language (English) successively to their native language (Dutch). Mastering a second language, particularly English, has direct advantages for implanted adolescents, for example for pursuing internationally oriented careers. Also, speaking a second language likely improves cognitive control, helping these adolescents to communicate better.

The objectives of the current study are
(1) To evaluate the abilities of implanted adolescents to learn a second language in the current school settings compared to normal-hearing and hearing-impaired peers;
(2) To identify and quantify environmental, sensory and cognitive aspects that affect second language acquisition in implanted adolescents;
(3) To assess positive effects of successful L2 acquisition on CI adolescents’ speech perception in adverse listening situations.

The first stage of the project (questionnaire stage) assesses self-perception of second language learning; the second stage of the project (behavioural testing) allow objective testing of second language abilities. Adolescent participants and their parents and teachers will answer questions regarding their language-, hearing and cognitive functioning, as well as demographics and environmental factors. Standard behavioural tests for language-, hearing and cognitive functioning will also be administered.

All participants will be Dutch and healthy, except for their hearing status. The population of interest is adolescents who underwent paediatric cochlear implantation. They are expected to experience difficulties during second language learning. Control groups are normal-hearing adolescents, and hearing impaired adolescents not implanted with cochlear implants.

There is no known risk, nor benefit associated with participation. Questionnaires will take maximally 3 hours to complete. Participation in experiments will take maximally 6 hours (2 sessions, maximally 3 hours per session) with adequate breaks to prevent fatigue.
- Main changes (audit trail)
- RECORD6-apr-2015 - 31-mei-2015


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