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Take it slow: Examining the efficacy of persuasive technology to alter eating rate: STUDY II


- candidate number23359
- NTR NumberNTR5566
- ISRCTNISRCTN no longer applicable
- Date ISRCTN created
- date ISRCTN requested
- Date Registered NTR4-nov-2015
- Secondary IDs057-14-010 / 2015/00386 NIHC NWO: Food Cognition & Behaviour
- Public TitleTake it slow: Examining the efficacy of persuasive technology to alter eating rate: STUDY II
- Scientific TitleTake it Slow: Feedback, Persuasive Technology and Reducing Eating Rates: STUDY II
- ACRONYM
- hypothesisOver 41% of the Dutch population is overweight, a known risk factor for a range of debilitating conditions. Modifying behaviours associated with overweight, such as eating rate, or the speed at which people consume food, could reduce overweight and improve health. Eating rate is a basic determinant of appetite regulation, as people who eat more slowly feel sated earlier and eat less. Unfortunately without assistance, eating rate is difficult to modify due to its highly automatic nature. The current study examines whether real-time vibrotactile feedback about eating rate delivered by a persuasive technology can alter eating behaviour in the home setting. We examine the effectiveness of two types of feedback, real-time vibrotactile and retrospective visual feedback. The main aim of the study is to test whether a four-week training period can help people to adopt a slower eating rate over time.
- Healt Condition(s) or Problem(s) studiedEating behaviour, Food intake, Weight
- Inclusion criteriaBoth males and females, between 18 and 65 years old, (self-reported) fast eaters, BMI 25 > and < 35
- Exclusion criteria< 18 years, > 65 years, BMI < 25 and > 35, gastric bypass patients
- mec approval receivedno
- multicenter trialno
- randomisedyes
- masking/blindingNone
- controlActive
- groupParallel
- Type2 or more arms, randomized
- Studytypeintervention
- planned startdate 16-nov-2015
- planned closingdate1-mrt-2017
- Target number of participants150
- InterventionsThe current study examines whether real-time vibrotactile feedback about eating rate delivered by a persuasive technology can alter eating behaviour in the home setting. We examine the effectiveness of two types of feedback, real-time vibrotactile and retrospective visual feedback. The main aim of the study is to test whether a four-week training period can help people to adopt a slower eating rate over time. At the beginning of the study, participants complete a baseline survey and we weigh and measure them. Baseline eating rate is assessed during a 7 consecutive day measurement period. During this period, participants will use the fork without any form of feedback. After establishing a baseline measure of eating rate, we randomly assign participants to an experimental between participants design with four conditions:
1. Augmented fork with vibrotactile feedback
2. Augmented fork with visual retrospective feedback
3. Augmented fork with both vibrotactile feedback and visual retrospective feedback
4. Augmented fork without any form of feedback Participants in all four conditions are asked to use the fork for a training period of four weeks. After this period, all participants use the fork without any form of feedback another week to establish post-eating rate. Moreover, they complete a survey and are weighed. This measurement is repeated eight weeks later in a two-month follow-up to test for sustainable changes in eating rate and weigh across the four conditions.
- Primary outcome- Average eating speed (number of servings per minute)
- Over speed ratio
- Secondary outcome- average meal duration
- average interval between servings
- Total fork servings
- BMI
Furthermore, potential confounding variables such as palatability, mood, time of day, and meal enjoyment will be assessed. Finally, the DEBQ (Dutch eating behaviour questionnaire) will be assessed.
- TimepointsAll primary outcomes will be measured at baseline, directly after the four week training period and at follow-up 2 months later. Secondary outcomes will also be measured at three time points; baseline, after training period and 2 month follow-up.
- Trial web site
- statusopen: patient inclusion
- CONTACT FOR PUBLIC QUERIESDr. Roel Hermans
- CONTACT for SCIENTIFIC QUERIESDr. Roel Hermans
- Sponsor/Initiator Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioural Science Institute
- Funding
(Source(s) of Monetary or Material Support)
NWO, SlowControl
- Publications
- Brief summaryThe current study examines whether real-time vibrotactile feedback about eating rate delivered by a persuasive technology can alter eating behaviour in the home setting. We examine the effectiveness of two types of feedback, real-time vibrotactile and retrospective visual feedback. The main aim of the study is to test whether a four-week training period can help people to adopt a slower eating rate over time.
- Main changes (audit trail)3-jan-2017: - Trial participants changed from 200 to 150 - Intervention: 2. Augmented fork with visual retrospective feedback not longer applicable
- RECORD4-nov-2015 - 3-jan-2017


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